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20121004
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English 55
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
thinking about emotional, financial, social, spiritual, environment, occupational and zerintellectual. because the eight dimensional model of wellness. this is how we conceptualize wellness. care about as a bonus because people are physically sick and many are dying before the general population. we care about intellectual honest because we need help the minds and how the bodies and the knowledge to reclaim and manage or light and recovery. weaker but social wellness because the conditions about social isolation, leading people further from their healthy recovery. we care about spiritual oneness because the disease, all of these diseases robs us of our sense of spiritual connectedness. return about mental and emotional rawness because people need clear, live at mines, in order to live a productive lives and pursue recovery. recurve and marijuana's because it is impossible for people to feel better or well in places -- we care about occupational wellness because we need jobs to fill our days, to give it time and -- we need stable incomes and savings in order to live comfortably and rid
in an environment, at least i was fortunate enough where we believed that it is perfectible. in a, it's very -- i think pretty much it's a acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be so critical or almost invariably critical as a country and pointing out what's wrong. there are obviously things around. there are obviously things wrong i grew up in georgia. that was pointed out, but there was always this underlying belief that we were entitled to be a full participant in we the people. that's the way we grow. it was the way the nuns would explain it to us. we were entitled to be full participants. it was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the declaration of independence. of course there were times that i to became quite cynical. the remarks and deciding the not so pleasant remarks in reciting the pledge of allegiance or say things that i think would -- whether or not cell phones. people couldn't youtube you and it's around forever. i was just of said. i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be better. the framework for it was th
the toyota prius as a simple but important way to make the commitment to the environment. now, let's visit another one of california's golden parks. hello, everybody. i'm huell howser, and here we are in the sierra nevada mountains in northern california. we're near the community of truckee. we e
to a digital environment. we are going it have a lo of dpa that. it's going to be the rocket fuel. we'll understand much more about as you said which students in which contexts and which situations, lots more addition seg -- the ability to dissegregate the data and understand more about specifics. that's definitely one of the important things. and data will also help us understand more about how people learn in general. we'll be able to understand, you know, about how do people actually tend to learn fractions and people able to test them on the theories in a more rapid -- much more rapid format than our previous sort of manual situation. >> there is some agreement that there's at least a kerneling of a good idea here. i wonder if you could talk about. a good idea usually don't cost $5 million or less. how exactly would it work? >> let me start. >> okay. , you know, when asked about the budget for hypothetical organization we did what the architects do. we put a blueprint together and twhaibt it would look like. we think about the staff you would need for an operation and where the mo
at the end of 2014 was prefaced on the idea that the surge would have created some better environment from which it would make sense we could leave because things would be better. if that promise is wrong and things after the surge are worse than before the surge, if things are not going to get better by the time we are set to leave, then why are we sticking with that as still being the time to leave? when the pentagon announced the end of the surge last week, when they announced the surge was over, they talked less about blunting taliban momentum and more about how the surge helped us train lots of afghan security forces. in theory, lots of trained afghan security forces is a way afghanistan could get more safe. but right now it's also a way americans get killed. by the afghans we are training and arming. afghan troops are turning around and killing american troops they're supposed to be working with at such a rate now that the training and joint operations between the two forces were halted this month. and have only now started to scale back up. that's the circumstances in which 68,000 a
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. not quite knowing what the next phase was going to be, you know, because you been, you know, this is what you had been doing. you know, working, working, working, working, working, working. and now you're talking about, well you know, i won't be, and i get the chance to spend more time with my wife and my kids. it's my world. that's my world. ♪ >> the reason that i think it pretty clearly, it was a terrorist attack is because a group of terrorists obviously conducted that attack on the consulate. >> this is turning into something not short of benghazi-gate. what is going on here? >> chris: defense secretary panetta, finally calling the benghazi assault an act of terrorism. while republican senator bob corker joins a growing number of officials questioning whether the obama administration was involved in a cover-up. and, we're back now with the panel. the director of national intelligence issued an extraordinary statement friday afternoon, that their initial information was, that it was a spon
as president today getting things done with the very polarized environment? [applause] >> terrific question. it is hard to answer. part of the answer is the following. lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955, the senate was and had been for decades -- let's put it that way -- taught to believe the same dysfunctional mess that it is today. bills couldn't get past because the power that confronted a president wasn't a party to this. wasn't republicans against democrats. it was interparty division. half of the democrats in the senate where southern democrats who were as conservative as can be imagined on civil rights and everything else and in that year, 1955, 16 great standing committees, the republicans were chairman of nine of them and senior committee post was stacked with them and subcommittees were headed buy them. they had stopped every president. no one seems to realize this but in the 25 years after the supreme court, when southern conservatives realized they and the midwestern republicans were on the same side and could control congress know president, franco low
mean investing in education, health care, the environment, and middle-class tax cuts and retirement security. that is my agenda and that is why i think that it's not just a question of experience. >> governor bush, one minute rebuttal. >> well, we do come from different places. i come from west texas. the governor is the chief executive officer. we know how to set agendas. i think you'll find the difference reflected in our budgets. i want to take one-half of the surplus and dedicate it to social security. one-quarter of the surplus for important projects, and i want to send one-quarter of the surplus back to the people who pay the bills. i want everybody who pays taxes to have their tax rates cut. and that stands in contrast to my worthy opponent's plan, which will increase the size of government dramatically. his plan is three times larger than president clinton's proposed plan eight years ago. it is a plan that will have 200 new programs -- expanded programs and creates 20,000 new bureaucrats. it it empowers washington. tonight you're going to hear that my passion and my vision i
the environment. this puts people to work and creates manufacturing jobs. it lowers gas prices. it helps everybody becauseit lowers the cost to heat your home in the winter, to cool it in the summer, the electricity we pay. that means your paycheck goes farther. that means people living on fixed income have more income to live on. this is important. with an energy policy like the keystone pipeline, opening our land for development, we can stop sending our money to the middle east. it helps our economy and paychecks. [applause] another area -- we have all these people in between jobs. for every person who got a job last month, nearly four people stopped looking for a job. we are slipping behind. what we see when we look at the faces, talk to the people, see the names, it is a person in their 30's, 40's, 50's, early 60's. i will get to the person in their 20's in a minute. [laughter] it is a person who came out of school, got a career, got a good job and then their job went away. when the factory left. now they do not have anything to replace it with. we need to help people in the middle of their ca
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> now, a cnn special report from kenya to vietnam to libya. activists are giving us a glimpse of how women worldwide are overcoming obstacles and changing their life for the better. "half the sky" has inspired a new documentary and profiles christophe and celebrity activists as they travel to different parts of the globe. he sat down with libya wild, meg ryan, gabriel and others about "half the sky" and how this project is so critical. >> we're going on a journey where the oppression of women and girls is truly the most extreme. we're traveling to six different countries and invited six different american actresses to join us
remember going to bed hungry many nights. i was raised in an abusive environment. if i told you how i accomplished all that i did, you would ask me how. many had a determination. the reason i was able to accomplish that is because i have the blessing of being born into the greatest country in the world. and you can all applaud him not. [applause] >> the greatest country in the world, no matter where you are born, how were you are, where you come from, who your mother was, who your dad was, that you are still able to achieve the what you achieved. the reason that is is because of the people who came before me who bought and gave us that right. i think we are losing sight of that right now. i have never been as afraid for our country as i am right now. i am very afraid for our country right now. we have to hold on to the greatness that we have. let me give you a little background here. you have to know when you are a winner. while that sounds like it's self-evident, it is not. when i was with "seal team six", i thought i was winning. you know, member of an elite counterterrorism unit, y
to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> half past the hour, i'm deb feyerick in for randi kaye. >> i'm victor blackwell. thank you for starting your day with us. chemical weapons in syria. youtube videos uploaded by an opposition group suggest rebels know where they are. cnn cannot independently confirm this video or the claims but syrian activists say it shows military installations in tunnels. we will go to more about this in just a moment. our mohammed jamjoon is in syria. >>> making a decision for themselves and their daughters. it's airing next week. it's inspired by his award winning book co-authored with his wife, cheryl. meg ryan, gabrielle union went to different corners of the globe to me
environment at home. >> how old are your boys? >> 5 and 6. >> they have a wonderful mother. you're so brave for being here. michelle, appreciate that. >> thanks a lot. >>> up next, we're talking about this -- >> republicans say it will prevent voter fraud. democrats call it voter serpgs. are stiffer id requirements limiting your right to vote? [ female announcer ] the best things in life are the real things. nature valley trail mix bars are made with real ingredients you can see. like whole roasted nuts, chewy granola, and real fruit. nature valley trail mix bars. 100% natural. 100% delicious. >>> welcome back. most republicans consider voter id laws a legitimate way to prevent voter fraud. most democrats see them as attempts as voter suppression. but whatever your view, the laws are stirring up political passions all around the country. don lemon spoke about it with cnn contributors elsi granderson and anna navarro. >> last time we talked about this, you got really passionate, you and will really went at it. and you were specific saying you weren't going to sugar-coat it. >> this is driven
's global environment so the export-led investment heavy model is not working. they did not make the change to consumption five years ago when they could have started it now they can't do it because the economy is in such distress. >>neil: are you saying desperate times call for this behavior? >>guest: they are trying to distract chinese people from what going open. the first two weeks this month, the next leaders of china is missing from public and the state media is quiet but at the same time the state media ramps up the propaganda against japan regarding the islands to deflect the attention of the chinese people. this is the political organization that's primary basis of legitimacy is the continuing delivery of prosperity. when it cannot do that it falls on nationalism which brings it in conflict with countries in the region and the united states. many of those countries are our allies or friends. >>neil: if the emperor has no clothes he is desperate? >>guest: yes, we have seen this in other countries and china. there are a lot of things going in the wrong direction and we are not really
want them to grow up as normal and happy as possible. and to have a safe environment at home. >> how old are your boys? >> 5 and 6. >> they have a wonderful mother. you're so brave for being here. michelle, appreciate that. >> thanks a lot. >>> up next, we're talking about this -- >> republicans say it will prevent voter fraud. democrats call it voter serpgs. are stiffer id requirements limiting your right to vote? olo. introducing the entirely new lexus es. and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. it's got that sweet honey taste. but no way it's 80 calories, right? no way, right? lady, i just drive the truck. right, there's no way right, right? have a nice day. [ male announcer ] 80 delicious calories. fiber one. up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly calculate your mortgage payment based on today's incredibly low interest rates... right from your iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is enginee
to be achieved in our tax system. i believe that we will be better off if we protect this environment. and contrary to what the president says, i think their record on the environment is inexcusable and often shameful. these laws are not being enforced, have not been enforced, and the public health and the air and the water are paying the price. that's not fair for our future. i think our future requires a president to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society fo
, and resilient cyber environment. we must work internationally because the cyber criminals do not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from any place around the world. last may the united states released a new international strategy for cyberspace to help provide a blueprint for building an international framework to make sure cyberspace more secure and reliable. much remains to be done in this area, as the need for sustained international engagement becomes more apparent every day. as much as we have done, there's still a lot of work to do, because of threats to cybersecurity are real, serious, and the eve of rapidly. together we can and we must maintain a cyberspace that is safe and resilience that remains a source of tremendous opportunity and growth for years to come. to that end, we need to work more effectively with the private sector to tackle the difficult challenges -- first, real time information sharing between the public and private sectors, and second, whiter adoption of cybersecurity best practices for the nation's critical infrastructure. i
declared war on schools, the environment, and unions, fair pay. we're all on our own if romney has his way. and he's against safety nets. if you fall, tough luck. so i strongly suggest that you wake the [ bleep ] up. >> well, joining me right now is daily show creator liz winsted. there's something the way these guys can do it and we can never do it, the sort of anti-hero types like sarah and samuel l. jackson. how do they connect with youngers voters who might be a little busy on election day? >> i'm not sure it's even just younger voters, chris. i think sometimes, and when i look at my audiences when i do standup and i'm talking about these issues, i'm surprised i don't see a room full of people that just have purple surprisede with purple foreheads smacking their heads saying, i can't believe this is happening. it is a home run when people sit up and take notice. >> joel stein, your comments on why this stronger language by samuel l. jackson may inspire young voters? >> it's fun. if you're not for obama, it's not going to convince you. but if you need to get to the polls and feel like,
much oil and gas that we know how to get without harming the environment. this puts people to work, this creates manufacturing jobs. it helps people heat their homes warmer in the winter, coomer in the summer. that means people living on fixed income have more income to live on. this is important because with an energy policy like the keystone pipeline, like opening up our lands for development, we can put americans back to work and stop giving money overseas to the middle east. it helps our foreign policy, it helps our economy, it helps our pay checks. [applause] another area, as i mentioned, you have all these people in between jobs. for every people that got a job last month, which is a good thing, nearly four people have stopped looking for a job. we are slipping behind. and what we see when we look at the faces, when we talk to the people, when we see the names, it is a person in their 30's, 40's, 50's, early 60's -- i'll get to the people in their 20's in a minute. it is a person that came out of school, got a career, got a good job, and then the factory left. then their job
as normal and happy as possible. and to have a safe environment at home. >> how old are your boys? >> 5 and 6. >> they have a wonderful mother. you're so brave for being here. michelle, appreciate that. >> thanks a lot. >>> up next, we're talking about this -- >> republicans say it will prevent voter fraud. democrats call it voter suppression. are stiffer id requirements limiting your right to vote? eo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. go national. go like a pro. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? yes, ma'am. 100 calories. yea...i'm gonna need some proof. we get that a lot... let me put you on webcan... see? hearty vegetables... lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth that tastes indulgent -- but isn't... so feel free to enjoy a bowl anytime. mmm i can still see you. [ male ann
political environment it is made out to be this is distortion or as laura said they are vulnerable on this. if you look at the polls, the american people are saying what is going on over in the middle east and now more and more americans saying we are not sure about how president obama's approach to the muslim world has worked and i think the romney campaign therefore things we can gain traction on this issue. >> there is a record, right? there is a record in iraq. >> and the issues in the campaign. >> chris: i want to move to one last question. we have a couple of minutes left. benjamin netanyahu's speech to the u.n. if nothing else will be remembered for his looks like a cartoon bomb drawing the red line. some experts read the speech as actually softening the approach to obama. he said he appreciates the obama administration stance towards iron and seemed to be putting off any possible attack against iran into next spring or summer. is that the way you read his speech? >> he is responsible and is not going to go and insult the president of the united states. i thought it was a classic ex
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members know... how to harness that power, because we help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. stay top of mind with customers? from deals that bring them in with an offer... to social media promotions that turn fans into customers... to events that engage and create buzz... to e-mails that keep loyal customers coming back, our easy-to-use tools will keep you in front of your customers. see what's right for you at constantcontact.com/try. alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amang. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay
see the problems of climate change, the environment, immigration that everyone is saying, what is that guy smoking? i see some potential for common ground. >> they think it is just as much to do with curry each because what you're talking about is people are afraid across the party line to go on a direction and because the voters are going to be upset and therefore they may not get reelected. what looks to remain objective and you go to office to get reelected, you're vulnerable. you cannot make a move anymore. i mean, we talk about the courage, you talk about senator mccain who was in vietnam and he was going through unbelievable torture. he risked his life going over there. every time coming in now, one of our brave men and women before iraq or afghanistan, they risk their life. they could risk their life for our country. why would the politicians be a little their office for mac in the right decision? [applause] that's where the problem lies because the president in his speeches to other changes to do it. and that, every police officer, every firefighter, every single family
kept a good thing going for 70 years in that part of the world. it's been that environment in which these tremendous economic transformations of one nation state after another can take place. we welcome that and we think that is a good thing. we want to keep going with that. that's what it's all about. on both of those questions all i can say is watch. >> one more question, how about in the back with the hand raised. i'm trying to be equal opportunity in this audience. >> tom referred for the malaysia and the world of affairs council. you talk about the need for peaceful resolution of disputes. i wondered if you could elaborate a bit about what stand referred to in the south china and the east china where the assertiveness is causing so much concern. >> we see that and i think we have a very principled position on all of this. first of all, people say we don't take sides in these disputes but it's not true, we actually do. when we take a side for freedom of navigation and peaceful resolution of these disputes. that's where we are going to stay. we don't always have a direct intermed
friendly, welcoming environment. it's called the 26th street flea market. it works here because it's right in the center of manhattan. woman: it's really been the main flea market in the country for years and years, and now it is changing. there's so much building. i find it hard to believe that this parking lot will be here very long, but as long as it is, it will definitely be a destination. man: everybody likes something else, and new york city's international city. in the flea market, there is a lot of old stuff, and it's sold from all over the world. people come back and see if they really loved it. that's why people come back and buy it. zubrod: it's like you're taking a trip to about a hundred different countries, but all at once. you're taking a trip back through time. you're going back to the '20s. you're going back to the '60s. i feel good surrounded by old things. a lot of the stylists and designers buy from us, and they go out and mass-produce things, and you find them in the stores...eventually. but you find them here first. i'm not really looking for the bargain of the centur
of touch millionaire has just declared war. on schools, the environment, unions, fair pay. we're all on his own if romney has his way. he's against safety nets. if you fall, tough luck. i strongly suggest that you wake the [ bleep ] up. >> and that ad was paid for by the jewish council for education and research, a superpack supporting obama. >>> massages, facials, perhaps a manni peddy. we'll have some advice on how to get the most out of your day at the spasm. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you've been years in the making. and there are many years ahead. join the millions of members who've chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. go long. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. special treat. >>> spas used to be a special treat, but now
of qe in that environment is going to be sufficiently poor, that the fed will step away. >> we're getting these weird cross currents. i'm glad you're here to ask about it. when the fed did it, we thought wow, things are worse than we thought. consumer confidence seems to be improving. the market was doing better. there's a lot of things that look like -- what were you talking about? what was so bad that you saw in this economy? but again, the transportation average is now down for the year. china looks worse than it was. are we entering a -- are we doing okay and accelerating in terms of growth, or are we slowing down again? >> i think there's probably three things that feed into it. first the transition mechanism wasn't working. people were instead of going out and buying risk assets and investigating companies, they were buying bonds in anticipation of the fed buying so. the operation twist was flattening the yield curve and trap iping liquidity there. i think the fact fact was constantly giving fixed numbers and fixed dates gives the market something to focus on when it ends
natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. . >>> he said he was a monster, one of the new chilling statements from the d.c. area sniper. lee boyd malvo. you w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)